BNL Physics Department Videos

Physics Colloquium of 9 April 2019
"Do Women Get Fewer Citations Than Men?"
Sabine Hossenfelder, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany

I will talk about the results of a citation analysis on publication data from the arXiv and inspire in which we explored gender differences. I will further explain how we can use bibliometric analysis to improve the efficiency of knowledge discovery.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/jC9me/

Physics Colloquium of 9 April 2019
"How Beauty Leads Physics Astray"
Sabine Hossenfelder, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany

Theoretical physicists often rely on beauty—simplicity and naturalness, in particular—as they develop new laws that describe nature. These guides have been strongly influential in the foundations of physics since the development of the standard model of particle physics, which describes all known fundamental particles and explains how they interact. During her talk, Hossenfelder will describe how arguments of beauty have led to a dead end as well as what can be done about it.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/jC9me/

Physics Colloquium of 4 April 2019
"Views and news on chiral transport"
Karl Landsteiner, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC

I present an effective action approach to chiral transport. Chiral Magnetic and Chiral Vortical Effect are treated in exact parallel and result in the known dependence on chemical potential and temperature. The approach sheds light on some of the more obscure features of chiral transport such as covariant and consistent anomalies and a seeming mismatch of the derivative expansion. As a related application I will comment on the thermal Hall effect on 2D topological insulators. Then I discuss a new example of chiral transport: anomalous Hall viscosity at the quantum critical point of the Weyl-semimetal/insulator transition. Results from a holographic model will be compared to a weak coupling quantum field theory analysis.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/fWJ4J/

Physics Colloquium of 3 April 2019
"Prospects on nucleon tomography"
Herve Moutard, Université Paris-Saclay

Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the three-dimensional quark and gluon structure of the nucleon. In particular the concept of Generalized Parton Distributions promises an understanding of the generation of the charge, spin, and energy-momentum structure of the nucleon by its fundamental constituents. Forthcoming measurements with unprecedented accuracy at Jefferson Lab and at a future electron-ion collider will presumably challenge our quantitative description of the three-dimensional structure of hadrons. To fully exploit these future experimental data, new tools and models are currently being developed. After a brief reminder of what make Generalized Parton Distributions a unique tool to understand the nucleon structure, we will discuss the constraints provided by the existing measurements and review recent theoretical developments. We will explain why these developments naturally fit in a versatile software framework, named PARTONS, dedicated to the phenomenology and theory of GPDs.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/vATV@/

Physics Colloquium of 26 March 2019
"Quantum Information Science Landscape, Vision, and NIST"
Carl Williams, NIST

The first part of the colloquium will provide an overview of United States government's interest in quantum information science from the National Strategic Overview for Quantum Information Science that established the policy objectives for this administration to the National Quantum Initiative Act that formalizes parts of this strategy for key civilian science agencies. This portion of the talk will conclude with placing the United States strategy in the global context and describe how the United States plans to establish the foundation for the quantum 2.0 economy. The second part of the colloquium will begin with a high-level overview of NIST, of NIST's interest in Quantum Information Science, before talking briefly about some interesting highlights from NIST laboratories. Moving from the highlights, the talk will explore ongoing and future metrological applications followed by some hypothetical conjectures of future technological applications with a focus on how quantum information science and its technology may impact fundamental physics from exploring potential time variation of fundamental constants to future probes of dark matter and gravitational waves.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/8sEuo/

Physics Colloquium of 19 March 2019
"Development of LArTPC for Neutrino Physics"
Xin Qian, BNL

Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC), with its mm-scale position resolution and the full-active-volume imaging-aided calorimetry, is an excellent device to detect accelerator neutrinos at GeV energy range. This technology may hold the key to search for new CP violation in the lepton sector, to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to search for baryon number violation, and to search for sterile neutrino(s). In this talk, I will review the existing achievements and current status of the detector development.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/lvMoX/

Physics Colloquium of 26 February 2019
"Precision measurement of neutrinos at Hyper-Kamiokande"
Akira Konaka, TRIUMF

Hyper-Kamiokande (HyperK) is a water Cherenkov neutrino detector whose construction in Japan was recently approved. The fiducial mass is 187kton, eight times larger than the Super-Kamiokande detector. The upgraded J-PARC accelerator located 295km away will provide high intensity neutrino and anti-neutrino beams tuned at the oscillation maximum. In this talk, I will describe the challenges of the systematic uncertainties in future neutrino oscillation experiments and how HyperK plans to address them. In addition to the observation of CP violation, Hyper-Kamiokande will explore directions that may become the main research topic in the future if something new is discovered: Precision neutrino oscillations to test the unitarity of the lepton flavour mixing, neutrino astronomy, such as supernova neutrinos and searches for astrophysical point sources of neutrinos, and searches for phenomena beyond the standard model, such as dark matter and nucleon decays.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/ifSWI/

Physics Colloquium of 19 February 2019
"Physics education research in higher education: What can we learn from the top cited papers in the Physical Review?"
Charles Henderson, Western Michigan University

The journal Physical Review Physics Education Research was started in 2005 as the archival research journal for the field of Physics Education Research (PER). In this talk I will identify some important findings from the field of PER based on highly cited articles from the journal. For example, there is strong evidence that in typical physics courses many students do not learn the core concepts of the discipline; student beliefs about physics become less expert like; and there is a significant gender gap, with men outperforming women. Many PER-based instructional strategies can improve student knowledge and some instructional strategies can improve student beliefs. However, implementation of these strategies is low because the field often uses ineffective dissemination strategies.

URL of online video: https://bluejeans.com/s/FMkED/

Other Listings

Colloquium Note

Colloquia can generally be viewed live by going to
https://bluejeans.com/308299597
Colloquia usually occur on Tuesday's at 3:30 pm.

Notes

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